Tri axle trailers

while surfin the net for pics of american custom trucks ive noticed tha triaxles are becoming popular mainly on the 53 footers.can anyone recomend some good custom truck sites.cheers :laughing: :laughing:

Try this one Carl :smiley:
www.the-truckers-page.com/picture_gallery.html

Should be enough on there to whet your whistle :laughing:

Tri-axles are extremely uncommon in the states. Most toll roads and bridges charge by the axle, so there is absolutely no incentive to run a 3-axle trailer unless you have some sort of blanket overweigh permit (as many fuel tankers here have). The percentage of 3-axle trailers in the states is less than 1%

Canada, OTOH, allows up to 60 Tonnes without special permits, and 3, 4 and 5 axle trailers are quite common. Up there, maybe only 50% of the trailers have only 2 axles.

thanks for the reply alex the pics i was lookin at were from a truck show in canada :laughing:

Alexx is right, The only tri-axles I have seen in quantity are some flatbeds being pulled by Suttles way on down Southern Alabama, the drivers hated them because they could’nt be slid, were all super singles and as far as they were concerned had an awful turning radius :open_mouth:

Cliff Warby:
Alexx is right, The only tri-axles I have seen in quantity are some flatbeds being pulled by Suttles way on down Southern Alabama, the drivers hated them because they could’nt be slid, were all super singles and as far as they were concerned had an awful turning radius :open_mouth:

Ah, yes, the tri-axle southern flatbeds. From what I’ve heard, some companies use these because their drivers were too dumb to figure out how to even the axle loads out. In that part of the world, toll roads and bridges are rare, so the extra axle doesn’t cost too much more. With a max of 80k lbs, a tri-axle tridem can handle as much as 46k lbs. Makes running legal almost guaranteed.

The Pepsi fleet here use tri-axles and carry 100,000 lbs, also some of the bulk trash haulers have them :exclamation:

AlexxInNY:

Cliff Warby:
Alexx is right, The only tri-axles I have seen in quantity are some flatbeds being pulled by Suttles way on down Southern Alabama, the drivers hated them because they could’nt be slid, were all super singles and as far as they were concerned had an awful turning radius :open_mouth:

Ah, yes, the tri-axle southern flatbeds. From what I’ve heard, some companies use these because their drivers were too dumb to figure out how to even the axle loads out. In that part of the world, toll roads and bridges are rare, so the extra axle doesn’t cost too much more. With a max of 80k lbs, a tri-axle tridem can handle as much as 46k lbs. Makes running legal almost guaranteed.

Well, that certainly makes sense, yes indeed, after all, it was in Alabama I’d seen 'em, and everyone knows, the majority of people from Alabama don’t have elevators that go to the top floor. It would be the perfect place to try out some no brainer trailers!, Cheers Alex.

Pat Hasler:
The Pepsi fleet here use tri-axles and carry 100,000 lbs, also some of the bulk trash haulers have them :exclamation:

Yes. Those have “R permits”, and aren’t legal in all states (like PA).

Actually, on this end of the state, the Pepsi distibutor (Clinton’s Ditch Distribution) uses only 48’ 2 axle trailers, but every one of them is set up to run as a turnpike double. On my way in today, I passed one pulling 2 empty 48’ers, and he was holding 70 mph up the fairly long hill at Victor.

Most of the gasoline tankers in NY are 3-axle units as well, using the same R permits.

What the %&$# is an ‘R Permit’ :question:
I keep seeing that sign “NO R PERMITS” everywhere, and each person I ask tells me they have no idea :slight_smile:

An R permit is for any truck that is over the STAA maximum weight of 40 tons.

Now, Pat, as a person who must’ve driven those typical ‘continental’ arrangement of a single screw and tridem trailer, let me ask you:
Do you think that a similar setup would work here in the US? In most states (NY being one), you can get 46k on a trailer tridem, 20k on a single-screw drive, and, depending on the width of the tyre, 14k or more on the steer. Add them up, and you have 80k, with a much more manouverable trailer. What do you think-could it work??

Could work… you never know… Would be nice.

Alex, I don’t know why they don’t have them here :question: Apart from the anti cabover thing.

I could turn a tractor/trailer over there on a sixpence, they are far more manouverable, especially with a rear lift axle :exclamation:

Umm…just how big is a sixpence, anyways?

Similar size to a dime mate :stuck_out_tongue:

And why do the Americans talk about weight in pounds?

A fat bloater who eats Wimpyburgers may weigh 300 lbs, but a truck that weighs 80,000 lbs. It is like shopping in Istanbul when you need 7 million lira to buy a cup of coffee :stuck_out_tongue:

We hardly talk about trucks weighing 44,000 kilogrammes.

Whats wrong with an old fashioned ton? or even a metric tonne?

Tell you another thing as well,They’ve never heard of a stone/cwt (Hundredweight) in weight terms neither.

…or a Fortnight :laughing:

Well, FWIW, Turkey has changed their currency, so now that coffee only cost 7, not 7 million…

I’m still foggy on just how weavy a stone is, cwt is rarely used, but we mostly all know that a fortnight is 2 weeks.

Unfortunately, upon hearing a reading of Lincoln’s Gettysburg address, when hearing the words “Fourscore and seven years ago…” most people don’t have a clue that this means 87 years.

:bulb: There are 14lb in a stone and 8 stone in a hundredweight (CWT) and 20 CWT in an imperial ton. :laughing: